Image: William Owens

William Owens, clutching a photo of son Ryan, the Navy SEAL killed in a January commando raid, says the administration is wrong to say that anyone who questions the raid does his son a disservice. Emily Michot / The Miami Herlad

Plans for the raid were begun during the Obama administration, but Obama officials declined to sign off on what officials described as a significant escalation in Yemen. Just five days in, Trump greenlighted the mission.

“Certainly the Obama administration, particularly by the end of its eight-year run, was very cautious in moving forward with any kind of military activity,” retired Adm. James Stavridis, a former NATO commander and current NBC News security analyst, said. “A new administration I think naturally is going to be spring-loaded to move out and demonstrate something.”

The White House has repeatedly called the Yemen mission a success. White House spokesman Sean Spicer said on Feb. 8 that anyone “who undermines the success of that raid owes an apology and [does] a disservice to the life of Chief Owens.”

“We gathered an unbelievable amount of intelligence that will prevent the potential deaths or attacks on American soil,” said Spicer.

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Yemen Raid Had Secret Target: Al Qaeda Leader Qassim Al-Rimi

A Defense Department official also pushed back Monday afternoon, saying the raid has yielded “a significant amount” of intelligence.

But the only example the military has provided turned out to be an old bomb-making video that was of no current value.

On Monday, Spicer addressed the remarks of Bill Owens, whose son died.

“I can tell him that on behalf of the president, his son died a hero and the information that he was able to help obtain through that raid, as I said before, is going to save American lives,” he said. “The mission was successful in helping prevent a future attack or attacks on this nation.”

Multiple senior officials told NBC News they have not seen evidence to support that claim.

In addition to the death of Ryan Owens, six other U.S. service members were wounded. And at least 25 civilians were killed, including nine children under the age of 13, according to the Bureau of Investigative Journalism. One of them was the 8-year-old daughter of U.S.-born al Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki.

A Pentagon official told NBC News today the Pentagon does not dispute these numbers.

A $70 million U.S. aircraft also was destroyed. The Pentagon already has at least three investigations into the raid underway.

“When we look at evidently very little actual intelligence out, the loss of a high-performance aircraft and above all the loss of a highly trained special forces member of SEAL Team 6, I think we need to understand why this mission, why now, what happened, and what the actual output was,” Stavridis said.