Author: By Glenn Kessler

Fact-checking President Trump’s Fake News Awards’ – Washington Post

GOOGLE NEWS President Trump on Jan. 17 announced the “2017 Fake News Awards” but the link that he tweeted led to a Web page that was “temporarily offline.” (Patrick Martin/The Washington Post) The “Fake News Awards” announced on the Republican National Committee website and touted by President Trump pose a conundrum: Does it really count if the news organization admits error? Regular readers of The Fact Checker know that we do not award Pinocchios if a politician admits error. Everyone makes mistakes — and the point is not to play gotcha. News organizations operate in a competitive arena and mistakes are bound...

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Fact-checking President Trump’s post-New Year’s tweets – Washington Post

GOOGLE NEWS (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) Back from holiday break, President Trump tweeted on a variety of issues Jan. 2. Per his usual practices, some of his assertions were factually questionable. Here’s a quick tour through his tweets. The people of Iran are finally acting against the brutal and corrupt Iranian regime. All of the money that President Obama so foolishly gave them went into terrorism and into their “pockets.” The people have little food, big inflation and no human rights. The U.S. is watching! — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 2, 2018 Trump was a fierce critic of the...

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Decoding HHS Secretary Price’s spin on the American Health Care Act – Washington Post

GOOGLE NEWS Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters) “The fact of the matter is that Medicaid spending under the proposal and under the budget goes up every single year.” “We have got 20 million folks out there across this land who have told the federal government, ‘Phooey, nonsense. I’m not going to participate in your program because it doesn’t do what I need done.’ So, they are paying a penalty.”— Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, interview on CNN’s “State of the Nation,” May 7 Price defended the American Health Care Act, the House GOP...

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AP FACT CHECK: Doubts persisted on Syria chemical weapons – Washington Post

GOOGLE NEWS Susan E. Rice. (Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press) “We were able to find a solution that didn’t necessitate the use of force that actually removed the chemical weapons that were known from Syria, in a way that the use of force would never have accomplished. Our aim in contemplating the use of force following the use of chemical weapons in August of 2013 was not to intervene in the civil war, not to become involved in the combat between Assad and the opposition, but to deal with the threat of chemical weapons by virtue of the diplomacy that we...

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Stephen Miller’s bushels of Pinocchios for false voter-fraud claims – Washington Post

White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images) White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller appeared on ABC’s “The Week” on Sunday, spouting a bunch of false talking points on alleged voter fraud. (He also repeated similar claims on other Sunday talk shows.) To his credit, host George Stephanopoulus repeatedly challenged Miller, noting that he had provided no evidence to support his claims. But Miller charged ahead, using the word “fact” three times in a vain effort to bolster his position. Here’s a guide through the back and forth. STEPHANOPOULOS: Let me move on, though, to the question of voter fraud as well. President Trump again this week suggested in a meeting with senators that thousands of illegal voters were bused from Massachusetts to New Hampshire and that’s what caused his defeat in the state of New Hampshire, also the defeat of Senator Kelly Ayotte. That has provoked a response from a member of the Federal Election Commission, Ellen Weintraub, who says, “I call upon the president to immediately share New Hampshire voter fraud evidence so that his allegations may be investigated promptly.” Do you have that evidence? Stephanopoulus is referring to a Feb. 10 Politico report of a closed-door meeting Trump held with senators to discuss the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court: “The president claimed that he and Ayotte both would have been...

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Kellyanne Conway’s claim of a ‘Bowling Green massacre’ – Washington Post

In an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Matthews on Feb. 2, White House counselor Kellyanne Conway defended President Trump’s travel ban with inaccurate claims of a “Bowling Green massacre,” and an Iraqi refugee ban under former president Barack Obama. Here’s what we think she meant. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post) “Two Iraqis came here to this country, were radicalized, and they were the masterminds behind the Bowling Green massacre. Most people didn’t know that because it didn’t get covered.” — White House senior adviser Kellyanne Conway, interview with MSNBC’s Chris Mathews, Feb. 2 In defending President Trump’s executive order temporarily banning refugees, immigrants and citizens from Iraq and six other Muslim-majority countries, Conway referred to something that didn’t happen — the “Bowling Green massacre.” (She also incorrectly said that Obama “banned” Iraqi refugees, which we have previously fact-checked as false.) Conway was on her way to a Four-Pinocchio rating when, about an hour and a half after The Fact Checker sent her a query about her remarks, she tweeted that she meant to say “Bowling Green terrorists.” On @hardball @NBCNews @MSNBC I meant to say “Bowling Green terrorists” as reported here: https://t.co/nB5SwIEoYI — Kellyanne Conway (@KellyannePolls) February 3, 2017 She referred people to an ABC News report: READ: Bowling Green Terrorists: Al Qaeda in KY: US May Have Let ‘Dozens’ of Terrorists Into Country as Refugees https://t.co/nB5SwIEoYI — Kellyanne Conway (@KellyannePolls) February...

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Fact-checking Donald Trump’s ‘major’ speech on the Islamic State – Washington Post

During a speech in Youngstown, Ohio, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump outlined some of his plans to defeat the Islamic State and protect the United States. (Sarah Parnass/The Washington Post) Donald Trump traveled to Youngstown, Ohio, to deliver what was billed as a “major” speech on how to deal with the threat posed by the Islamic State terror group, aka ISIS. For reasons known only to Trump, he continued to repeat false statements that have been repeatedly debunked in the past. So here’s a round-up of some of the more notable claims made in the speech. As is our practice, we don’t award Pinocchios in round-ups, but readers by now should be able to tell the real whoppers. “This summer there’s been an ISIS attack launched outside the war zones of the Middle East — hard to believe — every 84 hours.” This number comes from IntelCenter, a private counterterrorism intelligence company, but the time frame that Trump uses is cherry-picked. The group’s data from June 8 to July 20, 2016, have gotten attention for the number of terror attacks directed or inspired by ISIS: one attack every 84 hours.  That’s why Trump says that’s how many attacks there have been “this summer,” though the data cover approximately six weeks of the summer so far. CNN reported that the group’s count mirrors the outlet’s tracking data, but it’s just...

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