Author: David Riggs

Autonomous cars are driving the reinvention of IP protection

Lucas Dahlin Contributor Lucas Dahlin is an associate in Goodwin’s Intellectual Property group. He focuses his practice on complex intellectual property matters, with a particular experience in patent and trade-secret litigation. Julius Jefferson Contributor Julius Jefferson is an associate in Goodwin’s IP Litigation group. Prior to joining Goodwin, he clerked for judges of the District of Delaware and of the Eastern District of Texas. Before attending law school, Julius was a Research Fellow at Wyeth Pharmaceuticals (now Pfizer), where he worked on finding cures for Alzheimer’s disease. Darryl M. Woo Contributor Darryl Woo is a partner in Goodwin’s IP Litigation group. He is a veteran trial lawyer, concentrating his practice on patent litigation and other complex technology litigation. Early 1900s society struggled to transition from horse-drawn buggies to automobiles. It may seem odd today, but there was a time when there was no concept of “right of way,” speed limits or traffic signs and signals. Those rules had to be invented so that cars encountering carriages would not frighten horses into runaways — or run each other off the traveled dirt paths that sufficed for “roads” — and require help from their four-legged counterparts to free them. Fast-forward a hundred years. Quo Vadis is Latin for “whither goest thou,” an apt phrase for the free-ranging lifestyle enabled by the modern automobile. Come and go when you want, where you want and...

Read More

The next integration evolution — blockchain

Here is one way to look at distributed ledger technologies (DLT) and blockchain in the context of integration evolution. Over the years, businesses and their systems are getting more integrated, forming industry-specific trustless networks, and blockchain technology is in the foundation of this evolutionary step. Enterprise integration Large organizations have a large number of applications running in separate silos that need to share data and functionality in order to operate in a unified and consistent way. The process of linking such applications within a single organization, to enable sharing of data and business processes, is called enterprise application integration (EAI). Similarly, organizations also need to share data and functionality in a controlled way among themselves. They need to integrate and automate the key business processes that extend outside the walls of the organizations. The latter is an extension of EAI and achieved by exchanging structured messages using agreed upon message standards referred to as business-to-business (B2B) integration. Fundamentally, both terms refer to the process of integrating data and functionality that spans across multiple systems and sometimes parties. The systems and business processes in these organizations are evolving, and so is the technology enabling B2B unification. Evolution of integration There isn’t a year when certain integration technologies became mainstream; they gradually evolved and built on top of each other. Rather than focusing on the specific technology and year, let’s try...

Read More

Will tech companies change the way we manage our health?

Cyrus Radfar Contributor More posts by this contributor Amazon isn’t to blame for the Postal Service’s woes, but it will need to innovate to survive Dear United: Autonomous cars will pull you out of your seat As of September 2018, the top 10 tech companies in the U.S. had spent a total of $4.7 billion on healthcare acquisitions since 2012. The number of healthcare deals undertaken by those companies has consistently risen year-on-year. It all points to an increasing interest from technology companies in U.S. healthcare, which raises many questions as to what their intentions are, and what the...

Read More

Startup investors should consider revenue share when equity is a bad fit

Allie Burns Contributor Allie Burns is managing director of Village Capital, and co-author of a recent report, “Capital Evolving: Alternative Investment Strategies to Drive Inclusive Innovation.” There is plenty of blame to go around for tech’s monoculture of thought and ideas: VC firms stacked with Ivy League-educated white male partners; a reluctance by investors to seed businesses outside a few major cities on the U.S. coasts; investors’ obsession with a narrow set of capital structures. The most common option for funding early-stage ventures in the U.S. is equity. But stepping back to take a look at the bigger picture of American entrepreneurship, it becomes apparent that equity is not the right fit for many businesses. In July 2018, the Kauffman Foundation found that at least 81 percent of American entrepreneurs do not access venture capital — or, for that matter, a bank loan. This reflects not only the obstacles founders face when trying to access financing — debt often requires significant collateral, for example — but also the fact that not every company’s business model provides the scale and quick exit that investors expect with an equity investment. But what alternatives are out there? Quite a few, actually. Over the course of 2018, we interviewed more than 200 investors and asset managers to gauge their interest in various alternative capital strategies. We looked at everything from new fund vehicles to...

Read More

Why the world’s first smart highway will most likely be in China

Hugh Harsono Contributor Hugh Harsono is a former financial analyst currently serving as a U.S. Army officer. More posts by this contributor Television content creation in China Bank-based blockchain projects are going to transform the financial services industry China’s fast-paced growth has resulted in it being one of the most extremely flexible nations in terms of technological integration into existing infrastructure. With its relatively newer institutions and organizations, China can easily adapt existing infrastructure around current and potentially future technologies. Because of the rise of automated vehicles and their specific criteria, many have wondered how to properly establish specific...

Read More

Lessons from SpaceX: How to build the next Toyota Camry for space

M. Umair Siddiqui Contributor M. Umair Siddiqui, PhD is the chief scientist of Phase Four. In case you missed it, space is being democratized — and quickly. Last November, from a sheep farm in New Zealand, California-based Rocket Lab launched six payloads via their “It’s Business Time” small Electron rocket. The successful launch brings Rocket Lab one step closer to their goal of “super-frequent small payload deliveries.” Indeed, one of the satellites on board was built by high school students from Irvine, Calif.’s CubeSat STEM program. But it’s not just students and hobbyists in their garages toying with Estes...

Read More

In defense of screen time

Siri Fiske Contributor Siri Fiske is founder and head of MYSA School in Bethesda, Md. and Washington, D.C. The Silicon Valley engineers who design our tech gadgets won’t let their kids anywhere near those devices, according to a shocking New York Times profile. These workers are convinced too much time in front of smartphones and iPads is rotting kids’ brains. Technology “is wreaking havoc on our children,” warned one former Facebook employee. These parents need to relax. It’s true that allowing kids to browse social media until the wee hours of the morning isn’t a good idea. But it’s...

Read More

How the new VR screen could end the smartphone

Philip Rosedale Contributor A smartphone screen is a wonder of the world. It’s not just that it’s bright and colorful and sharp. In some ways, it’s as good as human biology allows. We’ve packed so many pixels into such a small space that any more would be lost on us. We can’t make the screens themselves bigger, because then they’d become too large to hold. The only way to get more information from a smartphone screen is to bring the pixels closer to our eyes, with the device somehow mounted on our heads rather than holding it in our hands. Instead of a phone as we usually think of it, it would be more like a pair of glasses. Sound unlikely? In fact, many smart CE companies (Apple, Microsoft, Google, HTC) are already working on this new screen. When it arrives, experiences you’ve only seen in the movies will become the stuff of everyday life. The “diffraction limit” for the human eye When you look through a small hole, things on the other side appear blurry. This is because when a ray of light passes through a hole on its way to your retina, it spreads out a little. Think of watching a wave from the ocean hit a sea-wall with a narrow opening: The way the straight wave becomes a ripple spreading out on the other side is...

Read More

Right Now in Politics and Business