Author: David Weigel

Rep. John Conyers Jr. resigns over sexual harassment allegations after a half-century in Congress – Washington Post

GOOGLE NEWS By Elise Viebeck and David Weigel, Facing multiple allegations of sexual harassment, Rep. John Conyers Jr. (D-Mich.) resigned as Congress’s longest-serving member Tuesday, becoming the first lawmaker to step down as Capitol Hill grapples with allegations of inappropriate behavior by lawmakers. Conyers, who represented the Detroit area for 52 years, yielded to mounting pressure from Democratic leaders to step aside as a growing number of female former aides accused him of unwanted advances and mistreatment. He has denied wrongdoing. From a hospital in Detroit, the 88-year-old congressman said he was “putting his retirement plans together” and endorsed...

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Poll: 65 percent of Democrats want party to ‘stand up’ to Trump

Senate Minority Leader-elect Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) in his office on Capitol Hill on Nov. 18. (Alex Brandon/AP) The Pew Research Center’s post-election voter survey has found that nearly two-thirds of Democrats, and 39 percent of all voters, want the opposition party to “stand up” to President-elect Donald Trump, “even if less gets done in Washington.” As the minority party studies the aftermath of the 2004 and 2008 elections for clues on how to stage a comeback, Pew’s numbers suggest that there is more enthusiasm for opposition to Trump than to any recently elected president. According to Pew’s 2008 polling, just 36 percent of Republican voters, and 22 percent of all voters, said that their party should oppose the incoming President Obama if it meant slowing down the work of the country. In 2008, just 11 percent of Democrats said they wanted Republicans to be a check on the president; last week, 14 percent of Republicans said that they wanted Democrats to be a check on Trump. In 2009, the Republicans obliged the minority — though, tellingly, they were slow to make clear what they were doing. In November 2008, at a similar point in Obama’s transition, then-Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell strategically praised Obama’s more bipartisan Cabinet hires and suggested that he could pass a crisis agenda through Congress quickly if he did not run to the left. “This is...

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Steve Bannon’s rise points to aggressive, anti-‘globalist’ Trump media strategy

Stephen K. Bannon talks about immigration issues while hosting “Breitbart News Daily” on July 20. (Kirk Irwin/Getty Images for SiriusXM) The morning after the presidential election, Trump campaign chief executive Steve Bannon called into the Breitbart.com radio show he had hosted when he ran the conservative website. His voice was rough, and slowed by fatigue, but there were scores to settle. “The hobbits finally had a chance to speak,” Bannon said to the site’s editor, Alex Marlow. He recalled a cable news segment on which some reporter asked why Nigel Farage, the leader of Britain’s successful campaign to quit the European Union, had introduced Trump at one rally. “Nigel Farage is a real hero to those people,” Bannon said, “and they know because they read Breitbart and they listen to this show.” [Trump faces backlash over appointing Bannon as a top aide] As most American media outlets analyzed the most shocking election since 1948, “Mr. Brexit” did not often figure in. But days later, Farage would fly to New York and post a Twitter photo with a tieless Trump, telling his followers that the new president had a “very positive reaction to [the] idea that Sir Winston Churchill’s bust should be put back in Oval Office.” The next day, French National Front politician Marion Maréchal-Le Pen tweeted that she too had been invited to meet with Trump. Until mid-August, Bannon...

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Pence asks Republicans to share WikiLeaks revelations about Clinton — but overstates what’s in them

Republican vice presidential candidate Mike Pence speaks at a campaign rally in Newton, Iowa, on Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall) BETTENDORF, Iowa — Republican vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence encouraged activists in the Quad Cities to “tell your neighbors and friends” about the emails published by WikiLeaks after a hack of a Hillary Clinton campaign account. But the examples he gave of damaging, dynamite excerpts offered less than his descriptions made them sound. Referring to a speech Clinton gave to the National Multi-Housing Council in 2013, partially reprinted in an email to top Clinton staffers, Pence said the Democratic nominee was disgracing the memory of Abraham Lincoln. “She actually gave a speech in which she said, in order to be successful politically, you have to, quote, ‘have a public and private position,’ close quote, on the issues,” Pence said. “When she was asked about that in the debate on Sunday night, did you see that? We got a little bit of a lecture about Abraham Lincoln or something. I couldn’t follow it, either — I was like, ‘Huh? Where are we going with that?'” In fact, while Donald Trump had mocked the Lincoln reference on Sunday night, the point Clinton was making in that speech was a reference to the 2012 film “Lincoln,” which at the time of the speech had just lost the Academy Award for Best Motion Picture....

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Trump fans wake, and wait in vain, for a WikiLeaks ‘October Surprise’

The Drudge Report’s front page before the WikiLeaks news conference. It was billed as the #OctoberSurprise, the moment when WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange might reveal the damaging, campaign-ending information he’d obtained about Hillary Clinton. It couldn’t come a moment too soon, as a wave of post-debate polling found Clinton regaining a lead over Donald Trump. Early Tuesday morning, the pro-Trump conspiracy site InfoWars launched a live stream to watch Assange’s “WikiLeaks 10″ anniversary news conference; readers of the Drudge Report, which the day before had led with a story about a man who claims to be the illegitimate son of Bill Clinton, splashed links to the Assange broadcast. What unfolded, over more than an hour before daylight broke on the East Coast, was a ramble bearing no resemblance to an “October Surprise.” Assange, who has been credited by Trump fans with campaign-changing clout ever since his website published emails obtained in a hack of the Democratic National Committee, spoke after an hour of updates on WikiLeaks’s content and legal fights, and dismissed a rumor that the news conference had been called to destroy Clinton. “There’s been a lot of misquoting of me and WikiLeaks publications,” he said. “In this particular case, the misquoting has to do with that we intend, or I intend, to harm Hillary Clinton or that I don’t like Hillary Clinton. All those are false. They come about...

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GOP congressman wants to know why FBI keeps releasing Clinton news on holidays

FBI Director James Comey speaks during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in Washington on  July 7. Comey was appearing before the committee to explain his finding that no reasonable prosecutor would bring a criminal case against Hillary Clinton, even though she and her staff were extremely careless in their handling of highly classified information. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg) The FBI’s decision not to pursue a criminal case against Hillary Clinton over her private email server did nothing to stop House Republicans from continuing to investigate it. FBI Director James Comey’s unprecedented public statement on the decision not to make a case was followed by a request to testify before the House Oversight Committee; that, in turn, led to a Republican request for the FBI’s notes on the investigation. And just this week, committee chairman Jason Chaffetz dramatically served FBI acting legislative affairs chief Jason Herring a subpoena, asking for all of the Clinton emails the bureau had obtained. “You don’t get to decide what I get to see,”  Chaffetz said. “I get to see it all.” Meanwhile, Rep. Mike Turner (R-Ohio), who sits on oversight and on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, has issued a new challenge to Comey: Why do the most scintillating details of the email investigation keep dropping on holiday weekends? In a letter to Comey, Turner notes that the news of Clinton’s FBI interview broke...

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Bernie Sanders returns to the campaign trail in New Hampshire

Sen. Bernie Sanders speaks at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July. (Paul Sancya/AP) MANCHESTER, N.H. — Bernie Sanders returned to the campaign trail on Monday and received the warmest welcome possible — a Labor Day breakfast, sponsored by the AFL-CIO, in the state that gave him one of his biggest primary wins. His mission: to help elect the Democrat who had run against him. “We are not talking about personalities,” said Sanders, explaining why he’d endorsed Hillary Clinton and would be stumping against Donald Trump. “We are talking about which candidate will better represent the needs of the American people.” Monday’s speech was Sanders’s first outside Vermont since the launch of his new group, Our Revolution, and his first for another candidate since the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July. He had spent the weeks in between working on a book, to be published after the November election, and weighing in on politics via Twitter and occasional interviews. [Bernie Sanders is finally campaigning for Hillary Clinton. But does she even need him?] In New Hampshire, Sanders was back in campaign mode, telling a roomful of Democrats and labor activists that Gov. Maggie Hassan (D), who has built a narrow lead in polls, needs to win her Senate race. “The future of the United States Senate is to a large degree the future of the United States of America,” he...

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