Author: Frederic Lardinois

GitHub Education is now free for schools

TECHCRUNCH GitHub, the code sharing and collaboration platform that Microsoft is acquiring, today announced that its GitHub Education suite of services is now available for free to any school that wants to use it to teach its students. GitHub previously trialed this program with a few schools and is now making it widely available. It’s worth noting that GitHub has long been available for free to individual students and teachers who want to use it in their classrooms. GitHub Education goes a step beyond this and offers schools access to GitHub Enterprise or Business Hosted accounts, as well as...

Read More

VirusTotal now protects developers from becoming false positives

TECHCRUNCH It’s been six years since Google acquired VirusTotal, a service that allows users to upload any file to check it for malware and viruses against the databases and algorithms of 70 antivirus and domain blacklisting services. Over the years, VirusTotal, which is now part of Alphabet’s Chronicle, has established itself as a neutral public service that has the trust of both users and developers, who can also access its service through an API. Today, the company is expanding on its core services by launching a new tool that allows developers to scan new code against the systems of...

Read More

Adobe debuts Project Rush, its new all-in-one video editor

TECHCRUNCH Adobe today announced the launch of Project Rush, a new video editor that takes the core features of its pro tools like Premiere Pro, After Effects and Audition and combines them into a single, more accessible tool. Don’t get too excited yet, though, the new tool will only be available later this year (and my guess would be a launch at the company’s Max conference in October). The target audience for Rush is the average YouTube creator who is looking to get professional-looking results — and do so fast because the expectation on the platform is for regularly...

Read More

Crate.io raises $11M and launches its hosted IoT data platform.

TECHCRUNCH Crate.io, the winner of our Disrupt Europe 2014 Startup Battlefield competition, today announced that it has raised an $11 million Series A round. In addition, the company also launched its ‘Crate Machine Learning Platform’ today, a new hosted solution for businesses that want to use the company’s SQL-based database platform for working with IoT data. The new funding round was led by Zetta Venture Partners and Deutsche Invest Equity, with participation from Chalfen Ventures, Momenta Partners and Charlie Songhurst. Existing investors, including Draper Espirit, Vito Ventures and Docker founder Solomon Hykes also participated. Crate co-founder and CEO Christian Lutz...

Read More

Pulumi wants to let you manage your infrastructure with code

TECHCRUNCH Pulumi, a Seattle-based startup that’s coming out of stealth mode today, wants to make it easier for developers and ops team to define their infrastructure by writing code. Instead of using a cloud-specific configuration language, the service’s tools allow developers to define the infrastructure for their applications in the same programming languages they already use for the applications. The service has the backing of Madrone Venture Group and Tola Capital, with Madrona’s S. Somasegar joining its board of directors. What’s interesting here is that it doesn’t matter whether that infrastructure is containers, virtual machines or a serverless function, or whether those will run in a private cloud or one of the major public clouds. Supported languages currently include JavaScript, TypeScript, Python and Go, with support for .NET, Java, C# and node.js following soon. Pulumi CEO Joe Duffy has extensive open source experience (he built the team at Microsoft that took .NET open source), so it’s no surprise that Pulumi, too, has a number of open source components. What the service offers in addition to that, though, is a hosted service for managing Pulumi stacks after they have been deployed, as well as tools for collaboration and integrating the service into existing workflows. As Duffy and his co-founder and executive chairman Eric Rudder argued when I met with the team ahead of today’s announcement, today’s vendor-specific templating languages only lead...

Read More

With its new in-car operating system, BMW slowly breaks with tradition

TECHCRUNCH When you spend time with a lot of BMW folks, as I did during a trip to Germany earlier this month, you’ll regularly hear the word “heritage.” Maybe that’s no surprise, given that the company is now well over 100 years old. But in a time of rapid transformation that’s hitting every car manufacturer, engineers and designers have to strike a balance between honoring that history and looking forward. With the latest version of its BMW OS in-car operating system and its accompanying design language, BMW is breaking with some traditions to allow it to look into the future while also sticking to its core principles. If you’ve driven a recent luxury car, then the instrument cluster in front of you was likely one large screen. But at least in even the most recent BMWs, you’ll still see the standard round gauges that have adorned cars since their invention. That’s what drivers expect and that’s what the company gave them, down to the point where it essentially glued a few plastic strips on the large screen that now makes up the dashboard to give drivers an even more traditional view of their Autobahn speeds. With BMW OS 7.0, which I got some hands-on time with in the latest BMW 8-series model that’s making its official debut today (and where the OS update will also make its first appearance),...

Read More

App Maker, Google’s low-code tool for building business apps, comes out of beta

TECHCRUNCH It’s been a year and a half since Google announced App Maker, its online tool for quickly building and deploying business apps on the web. The company has mostly remained quiet about App Maker ever since and kept it in a private preview mode, but today, it announced that the service is now generally available and open to all developers who want to give it a try. Access to App Maker comes with any G Suite Business and Enterprise subscription, as well as the G Suite for Education edition. The overall idea here is to help virtually anybody...

Read More

Amazon starts shipping its $249 DeepLens AI camera for developers

TECHCRUNCH Back at its re:Invent conference in November, AWS announced its $249 DeepLens, a camera that’s specifically geared toward developers who want to build and prototype vision-centric machine learning models. The company started taking pre-orders for DeepLens a few months ago, but now the camera is actually shipping to developers. Ahead of today’s launch, I had a chance to attend a workshop in Seattle with DeepLens senior product manager Jyothi Nookula and Amazon’s VP for AI Swami Sivasubramanian to get some hands-on time with the hardware and the software services that make it tick. DeepLens is essentially a small Ubuntu- and Intel Atom-based computer with a built-in camera that’s powerful enough to easily run and evaluate visual machine learning models. In total, DeepLens offers about 106 GFLOPS of performance. The hardware has all of the usual I/O ports (think Micro HDMI, USB 2.0, Audio out, etc.) to let you create prototype applications, no matter whether those are simple toy apps that send you an alert when the camera detects a bear in your backyard or an industrial application that keeps an eye on a conveyor belt in your factory. The 4 megapixel camera isn’t going to win any prizes, but it’s perfectly adequate for most use cases. Unsurprisingly, DeepLens is deeply integrated with the rest of AWS’s services. Those include the AWS IoT service Greengrass, which you use to deploy models to...

Read More

Right Now in Politics