Author: Matt Burns

Review: Shinola Canfield headphones are an overpriced mess

TECHCRUNCH T he Shinola Canfield headphones cost $600 and do not ship with a 1/2-inch stereo adapter. That should tell you everything you need to know. But if not, keep reading and let me explain why these fashion headphones are not worth the price. I tested these headphones in a way that I thought they would be most widely used. I pitted them against several competitors using my iPhone 8 with Spotify. I also used an Onkyo stereo receiver with a Audio Technica turntable to test their upper limit. It was an enjoyable afternoon. Before we get started, it’s important to note that I’m not a professional audio reviewer. I don’t have balanced power cables or a selection of FLAC tracks dedicated to testing equipment. But I do have a nice collection of headphones and a rather shitty taste in music. I don’t like a lot so I listen to the same stuff over and over. That’s annoying for passengers on road trips but handy when testing headphones. The Shinola Canfields are the company’s first set of headphones. They’re built overseas, and tested in Detroit where Shinola also puts together watches and constructs leather goods. These come from America. Kind of. Let’s back up. Shinola is a watch company born from the minds behind Fossil and launched as a marketing scheme out of Plano, Texas. The company set up...

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Inciting a new future

TECHCRUNCH S wati Mylavarapu and Matt Rogers are the definitive Silicon Valley power couple. Rogers, a cheerful, be-fuzzed technologist, co-founded Nest Labs. Swati, a sharp visionary, was at Square for four years before joining legendary investment firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers as a partner. Now they’re ready for act two. The pair have just launched their new investment platform, Incite, and are looking to the future with a timeline generally unheard of within the Valley. The bottom line? Matt and Swati are looking to fund world-changing startups no matter how long it takes to see a return on investment....

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Amazon Prime Video finally lands on Apple TV

TECHCRUNCH Tim Cook said six months ago Amazon Prime Video was coming to Apple TV sometime before the end of the year. And here it is: the long-awaited app is finally available on Apple TV and the iOS flavor was updated to support the iPhone X. The native tvOS versions is compatible with Apple TV 3rd generation devices or later. If the app isn’t visible yet, try searching for Amazon Prime Video on the Apple TV and it should pop-up. The release of the Apple TV app could signal Apple TV’s return to Amazon, as well. Amazon CEO Jeff...

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The company behind Dots is changing CEOs

TECHCRUNCH Playdots, the company that lets gamers play with Dots, will soon have a new CEO as co-founder and current COO Patrick Moberg takes over for co-founder Paul Murphy. Murphy lead the company as CEO since the founding in 2013 and will stay with Playdots as a board member. Murphy and Moberg co-founded Playdots in 2013 and in 2015 led the company to spin out of betaworks on the back of $10 million in funding from Greycroft Partners, Tencent and others. Murphy is seemingly leaving the company in a good state of affairs, explaining in a post on Medium...

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9 smart home gifts for a smarter smart home

TECHCRUNCH iRobot Braava Jet Mopping sucks. That’s why we have robots and the $200 Braava Jet 240 does a decent job at keeping my hardwood floor clean. It’s not perfect, but the little robot is so damn adorable. The Braava Jet has a Wall-E vibe to it and I love it. The Braava Jet is less autonomous than its Roomba siblings. The unit does not have a dock. Instead, there’s a battery pack that needs to be recharged, and users will need to fill the bot with water and install a fresh cleaning pad. Once those are done, though,...

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HealthMatch wins TechCrunch Startup Battlefield Australia

TECHCRUNCH Next Story Duolingo can now help you learn Chinese TechCrunch is proud to announce HealthMatch is the winner of the TechCrunch Startup Battlefield Australia and FluroSat is the runner up. A panel of expert judges picked the winner of out of the batch of five finalists that also included CancerAid, Life Whisperer and Spalk. The startups from Australia and New Zealand were hand-picked to participate in our highly competitive startup competition. They all presented in front of multiple groups of VCs and tech leaders serving as judges for a chance to win $25,000 and an all-expense paid trip for two to San Francisco to compete in TechCrunch’s flagship event — Disrupt SF 2018. HealthMatch makes clinical trials more accessible to patients who need them. Recruiting for clinical trials can prove costly for CROs and tedious and time-consuming for patients. HealthMatch uses machine learning and proprietary algorithms to efficiently match patients with the trials for which they’re eligible. The service is completely free for patients and charges CROs on a per-client basis or on an annual license. FluroSat helps agronomists (the scientists working on farms) determine where to distribute their fertilizer, water and pesticides. It does this by analyzing hyperspectral imagery to find where the crops are particularly threatened or stressed. As a result, FluroSat says its farmers can grow more crops with fewer resources. This was the first event...

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Hear from leading venture capitalists at Disrupt Berlin

TECHCRUNCH TechCrunch Disrupt is returning to Berlin this December, and among the founders and developers speaking, we’re pleased to have leading venture capitalists on stage to talk about fundraising, entrepreneurship and the trends they’re looking to fund. The show is jam-packed, and just like every Disrupt, the focus is on startups and the bleeding edge of technology. Fifteen startups are launching in Startup Battlefield and hundreds of young companies are exhibiting in Startup Alley. And though spots are limited, every Disrupt attendee can participate CrunchMatch, a free program that connects founders and investors based on their specific criteria, goals...

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Attending CES 2018? TechCrunch wants to see your company

TECHCRUNCH CES is a horrible, god-awful experience that will shave years off your life. The casinos, the food, the people, the germs. Horrible. All of it. But we love it! And we’re sending a huge contingent to the show again this year and want to see your gadgets, toys and products. TechCrunch cares much more for the hardware startups than the big CE players. We want to see the future FitBits and the company that will be the next GoPro. If you have a hoverboard that’s actually novel, let us know. Do you have a new drone that does...

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