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Trump’s surrogates are a decidedly B-list group of Trump supporters who argue his case on the airwaves. Though all presidential campaigns have surrogate networks, Trump has a complication: Credentialed conservatives and elected Republicans generally won’t defend him. And so the cable news outlets scrape the bottom of the barrel to find people willing to make Trump’s case. Little wonder veteran GOP operative Kevin Kellems quit as head of Trump’s surrogate operation earlier this summer after less than two weeks on the job. The Washington Post has done a great job of rounding up Trump’s professional, deplorable defenders:

Al Baldasaro, a surrogate for Trump on veterans’ issues, said in a radio interview that Clinton should be “put in the firing line and shot for treason.” He also suggested Khizr Khan, the Gold Star father who spoke at the Democratic convention, is a “Muslim Brotherhood agent.”

Surrogate Scottie Nell Hughes, a TV regular, said after Democratic vice-presidential nominee Tim Kaine spoke in Spanish: “I’m hoping I’m not going to have to start kind of brushing up on my ‘Dora the Explorer’ to understand some of the speeches.” Hughes, asked on CNN about the possibility of violence at the Republican convention, said: “Riots aren’t necessarily a bad thing.”…

Surrogate Omarosa Manigault, once a contestant on “The Apprentice,” defended violence against demonstrators at Trump events: “You get what’s coming to you.” Andrew Dean Litinsky, also a former “Apprentice” contestant, defended a 78-year-old Trump supporter who sucker-punched a black protester at a Trump event: “It looks like good exercise.”…

On CNN, surrogate Jeffrey Lord has distinguished himself by saying the Ku Klux Klan is “a function of the left.” After Trump said the U.S.-born judge in a case against him was a “Mexican” whose heritage disqualified him, Lord said those criticizing Trump were the real racists. And young Trump surrogate Kayleigh McEnany cheerfully defended waterboarding as a “bit of discomfort.”…

Then there’s national spokeswoman (and reality TV star) Katrina Pierson, whose pre-Trump days include 2012 tweets asking if 9/11 was “an inside job” and lamenting that both President Obama’s and Mitt Romney’s fathers were born abroad. “Any pure breeds left?” she asked.

We haven’t even touched on Trump’s relatively new campaign manager, Kellyanne Conway, who is no doubt kicking herself for taking the job of getting such a loose cannon like Donald Trump the top job in the land. Then again, like all of Trump’s professional enabling team, he probably told them to name their price: Pay-to-play, all the way.